LANGUAGE AS SOUND

AS ART MATERIAL

In these strange times, engagement with the natural environment has been highlighted as a precious part of our ability to survive, make sense of the world around and within us, and mediate our health at all levels of being. The importance of the natural environment’s place has been foregrounded, as has our impact on it. So too, has our ability to redress the balance when – motivated to do so.

For institutions whose business is engagement with this environment, it may be an opportune moment to ask questions of critical reflexivity. 

How are NTNU’s discourses shaping the way in which it engages with the natural environment? Do these discourses affect the way in which its stakeholders are perceived? What are the limits of NTNU’s episteme, and how might these be identified, to illuminate the ways in which stakeholders are ‘produced’ by discourse?

How might we apply the imaginary, as a sensory modality, to enliven and enchant knowledge-making, rather than aim simply at explanation? Could the inclusion of a fuller range of voices – not only from other disciplines and external stakeholders but from within our non-professional selves – add a lyrical dimension to saltwater worlds, or renew our reverence for the natural environment? Could these enchantments leak into our disciplinary philosophies, daily working habits, informal opinions or formal communications to improve research outputs in some way?

How do different research centres, departments or individuals at NTNU reinforce language use? How dimensional are their vocabularies? Do these practices change with context, audience, or over time? Are they static? How might we make ourselves more sensitive to the contours, textures and patterns in our language? How may we enrich the ways in which we use language, by widening the semantic net beyond our own disciplines? From morphemes to gestalt verbal units, what changes can be affected? How can we develop individual or collective practices for magnifying and demagnifying our field of attention, with respect to our dialects?

3 days ago
I applaud Francesca, the @LoveTheOceans team and the entire community for doing what they can to push for a marine protected area in the Jangamo Bay.

https://t.co/tn6OUtERWu https://t.co/IoaP2wgAMf
SylviaEarle photo
7 days ago
You can’t take care of climate change without taking care of the ocean. https://t.co/StZb3RfU4W SylviaEarle photo
2 weeks ago
The Salish Sea holds immensely important biodiversity. This body of water has provided the residents of Seattle up to Vancouver with vital natural resources for millennia.

https://t.co/VC89tZA3am https://t.co/tTFEuFWBzX
SylviaEarle photo
2 weeks ago
I feel like a witness to the greatest era of change on the planet as a whole. https://t.co/YzirX3Yjhs SylviaEarle photo
3 weeks ago
Please join me and my friends Craig Foster and Will Travis for a conversation about the Sea Change Project, a group that is dedicated to the protection of the Great African Sea Forest in the False Bay Hope Spot, freediving, and ‘My Octopus Teacher’!

https://t.co/W4fvdKOdfJ https://t.co/KSfLr12CHV
SylviaEarle photo
3 weeks ago
Thanks @Teresaribera! I #taketheball for #SDG 14: Life Below Water because the ocean is the lifeblood of our planet.

My dear friend and fellow conservation champion
@KrisTompkins_ you are up next for #SDG15: Life on Land

@TompkinsConserv @amigosdelosparq @MissionBlue #30×30 https://t.co/SQNJKywulG
17 hours ago
.
“We were shocked to find larvae of so many species, and even entire families of fishes, that were only found in surface slicks.”

@FishWhit discovering “nursery superhighways” that are home to marine larvae of at least 112 species. MT @pewenvironment https://t.co/MimBirP2bs
2 days ago
.
Even when an octopus can’t see light with its eyes, its arms seem to know it is there. https://t.co/iHHYk3jwr2
2 days ago
.
Manatees May Carry Half a Million Microscopic Hitchhikers https://t.co/iPGjg2Me8T
3 days ago
.
The latest consequence of climate change: The Arctic is now open for business year-round https://t.co/Z0VkNQj1Yw #FridaysForFuture #ClimateActionNow
3 days ago
.
Pandemic ocean activity!

Check out the @wildsalmoncntr‘s chinook salmon series.

Part 4: Orcas and Actions 👇
https://t.co/4QEVow5NFg
4 days ago
.
Pandemic ocean activity!

Check out the @wildsalmoncntr‘s chinook salmon series.

Part 3: The Key in the Code 👇
https://t.co/EUDHwaJBuc
21 hours ago
When I lived in Brazil, under the Sarney and Collor governments, people called it “o pais da impunidade”: the land of impunity.
It now seems like an apt description of the UK.
https://t.co/C0xXHpgn33
3 days ago
I find the @sciencemuseum‘s response to my withdrawal mealy-mouthed and incoherent.
https://t.co/Kn6qKPJ4DR
3 days ago
I’ve now withdrawn from the event I was doing at the @sciencemuseum, after discovering that it is still taking sponsorship money from the oil companies BP and Equinor. Such companies use these deals to sustain their social licence to operate – ie to destroy the living planet.
3 days ago
1. In the southern Cambrian Mountains, in central Wales, there’s a Terrestrial Dead Zone of around 300 km². It’s composed of degraded blanket mires, entirely dominated by a coarse grass called Molinia, in which other lifeforms, such as birds and insects, are scarcely to be found. https://t.co/dVdfoThCL0 GeorgeMonbiot photo
4 days ago
. @Plaid_Cymru should be ashamed of itself. It talks at great length about national pride. But where’s the pride in turning this beautiful country into a toxic dump? https://t.co/Qk8A5SrJ1Z
4 days ago
Remember when we laughed at the Americans for rebranding French fries as “Freedom fries”, because France wouldn’t join the Iraq War? https://t.co/dhQRBHUWNh
GeorgeMonbiot photo
Nick🇬🇧🇪🇺 @nicktolhurst
British supermarkets & producers increasingly “de-Europeanising” foods for post-Brexit UK.

So for example “Petits Pois” (a term much of the world uses regardless of where they come from) has now become “British fancy peas” with Union flag. https://t.co/FrEf0phiAZ