LANGUAGE AS SOUND

AS ART MATERIAL

In these strange times, engagement with the natural environment has been highlighted as a precious part of our ability to survive, make sense of the world around and within us, and mediate our health at all levels of being. The importance of the natural environment’s place has been foregrounded, as has our impact on it. So too, has our ability to redress the balance when – motivated to do so.

For institutions whose business is engagement with this environment, it may be an opportune moment to ask questions of critical reflexivity. 

How are NTNU’s discourses shaping the way in which it engages with the natural environment? Do these discourses affect the way in which its stakeholders are perceived? What are the limits of NTNU’s episteme, and how might these be identified, to illuminate the ways in which stakeholders are ‘produced’ by discourse?

How might we apply the imaginary, as a sensory modality, to enliven and enchant knowledge-making, rather than aim simply at explanation? Could the inclusion of a fuller range of voices – not only from other disciplines and external stakeholders but from within our non-professional selves – add a lyrical dimension to saltwater worlds, or renew our reverence for the natural environment? Could these enchantments leak into our disciplinary philosophies, daily working habits, informal opinions or formal communications to improve research outputs in some way?

How do different research centres, departments or individuals at NTNU reinforce language use? How dimensional are their vocabularies? Do these practices change with context, audience, or over time? Are they static? How might we make ourselves more sensitive to the contours, textures and patterns in our language? How may we enrich the ways in which we use language, by widening the semantic net beyond our own disciplines? From morphemes to gestalt verbal units, what changes can be affected? How can we develop individual or collective practices for magnifying and demagnifying our field of attention, with respect to our dialects?

7 months ago
Imagine what it’s like to go where you have a mile of water over your head. It’s dark, but it’s beautiful. https://t.co/p4kS8hZend SylviaEarle photo
8 months ago
Hope Spots are about recognizing, empowering, and supporting individuals and communities around the world in their efforts to protect the ocean. #HopeSpots https://t.co/THlBlOnTES SylviaEarle photo
8 months ago
I applaud Francesca, the @LoveTheOceans team and the entire community for doing what they can to push for a marine protected area in the Jangamo Bay.

https://t.co/tn6OUtERWu https://t.co/IoaP2wgAMf
SylviaEarle photo
8 months ago
You can’t take care of climate change without taking care of the ocean. https://t.co/StZb3RfU4W SylviaEarle photo
8 months ago
The Salish Sea holds immensely important biodiversity. This body of water has provided the residents of Seattle up to Vancouver with vital natural resources for millennia.

https://t.co/VC89tZA3am https://t.co/tTFEuFWBzX
SylviaEarle photo
8 months ago
I feel like a witness to the greatest era of change on the planet as a whole. https://t.co/YzirX3Yjhs SylviaEarle photo
7 months ago
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New satellite images show Northern California’s kelp forest is almost gone. 😯 Here’s why: https://t.co/Yupp4jdpxK HT @acousteau
7 months ago
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Federal funding boosts volunteer efforts to remove thousands of abandoned boats in B.C. https://t.co/YKaXZs4CeB RT @studio419
7 months ago
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Did you know that worldwide, ~200 million ppl depend on coral reefs for protection from waves & storm surges? Protecting the ocean isn’t just about nature—it’s an important step toward building a resilient future for all of humanity. MT @NG_PristineSeas 📸 @Enric_Sala https://t.co/73u5KEvRKj
Oceanwire photo
7 months ago
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How New Zealand is using drones to protect endangered dolphins, via @wef https://t.co/xRKDTq2NcN
7 months ago
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New research suggests more whales than previously thought have been entangled at some point. https://t.co/Uk9cx1c4Gj

Entanglement is a terrible but preventable issue! We can all do our part to ensure our waste is disposed of safely. MT @WhaleTalesOrg #talesofsavingwhales
7 months ago
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VIDEO: Horseshoe Crabs, known as “living dinosaurs,” are over 350 million years old. Now, they’ve been critical to the development of COVID-19 vaccines. https://t.co/VvB1JAoYvx
7 months ago
If this isn’t a resigning matter, we can kiss goodbye to any notion of standards in public life.
https://t.co/D9RFKP2DqH
7 months ago
1. I will lose friends over this thread. But I feel it would be dishonest not to say what follows.
It seems to me that we need to distinguish between two different issues, that are often confused:

A. Whether the UK is better off in the EU.

B. Whether the EU is a good thing.
7 months ago
Amazing and inspiring. https://t.co/97n43U8Q4g
GeorgeMonbiot photo
Rewilding Britain @RewildingB
Wow, wow wow!

Rosie & Alexa have raised over £1,300 for Rewilding Britain! Such determined girls, they’re litter picking across 100 miles this month to help secure a brighter future for their local wildlife. Go and show them some love! 💚

https://t.co/TtjQqkFVh8 https://t.co/uDKXffFkHC
7 months ago
As an independent researcher without university ties, I’m completely reliant on Sci-Hub for access to scientific papers, thanks to the greedy behaviour of academic publishers.
I read about 50 a day. Now it’s been hit by a blocking order, does anyone know a workaround? Thanks.
7 months ago
If someone bellows that they are too fit and tough to catch Covid-19 – as several men have in response to my tweets this morning – and that Long Covid only affects unhealthy wimps and is all-made-up-anyway, it’s likely to be because they are deeply afraid of something else.
7 months ago
Selfishly, I’m delighted schools are opening tomorrow. Home schooling has become ever harder, and we’ve already had the virus, so probably won’t get reinfected.
Less selfishly, I’m apprehensive. Transmission rates are still quite high, and many schools are not Covid-safe.